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You’ve started a small business and want to make sure it is protected. But how much will it cost to buy insurance that will cover you for potential property damage, liability lawsuits, or other issues that come up along the way? That will depend on a number of factors:

  1. What you do or sell.
    How much you pay for insurance depends on what type of business you run. The higher the risk, the more you’ll pay. For example, janitors, construction workers, and manufacturers often have some of the highest rates for general liability insurance, because they deal with (and could potentially damage) other people’s property. Your liability risk matters as well. For example, the risk of incurring liability for injury to third parties is likely greater for a business that performs security services than for a business providing accounting services.
     

  2. Where you live.
    There are obviously greater risks for property damage in high-hazard flood or wildfire zones than in places where weather-related incidents are less likely to occur, and insurance premiums often reflect the different level of risk. You can take certain steps to reduce risk for property damage from natural catastrophes, but if your business is located in one of these high-hazard areas, you’ll know that the cost of property insurance is likely going to be higher than it might be in other locations.

    Row of small shops


  3. Where you operate your business.
    Do you run your business out of a rented space, or do you own the building? Each of these situations has its own risks, depending on the type of business you run. For example, if you rent space for a restaurant, you’ll likely pay more for property insurance premium than if you run a real estate business from a rented space because the risk exposures from restaurant equipment are greater than risk exposures in a general office environment. But, if you own the space for your restaurant, you’ll likely pay more for property insurance premiums than if you rent, because your coverage will typically insure against damage to the building itself, not just the contents inside.
     

  4. Your prior claims history.
    Insurance companies will also look at your past claim history, if you have one. For example, if you’ve been sued a number of times for mistakes you’ve made in providing services, an insurer may consider this a trend that will continue and charge higher premium for the higher risk presented. Or, if one of your delivery drivers has been in a series of accidents, an insurer may charge higher premiums for your auto policy than if all drivers on the policy had a clear driving history.

This document is advisory in nature and is offered as a resource to be used together with your professional insurance advisors in maintaining a loss prevention program. It is an overview only, and is not intended as a substitute for consultation with your insurance broker, or for legal, engineering or other professional advice.

Chubb is the marketing name used to refer to subsidiaries of Chubb Limited providing insurance and related services. For a list of these subsidiaries, please visit our website at www.chubb.com. Insurance provided by ACE American Insurance Company and its U.S. based Chubb underwriting company affiliates. All products may not be available in all states. This communication contains product summaries only. Coverage is subject to the language of the policies as actually issued. Surplus lines insurance sold only through licensed surplus lines producers. Chubb, 202 Hall's Mill Road, Whitehouse Station, NJ 08889-1600.